Why do successful business owners have a basic need to control and direct?

Such people have a general need to be in charge not only of their businesses, but also of their own lives.  However, control and direct are relative terms.  Those who are autocratic, in a command and control sense, probably are micro managers, who may achieve production from their people, but little affection.  Conversely, those who are leaders and who motivate their charges are far more likely to achieve both.

Leadership requires that one operate on both an intellectual level and an emotional level as well.  While staying on top of everything is critical in a small business, treating people, employees, customers, investors and other stake holders with respect and consideration is of the utmost importance. ”

Quoted from  The Successful Entrepreneur, Second Edition, now available in print or eBook from Amazon.  Or contact http://www.yorkinc.com.

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Why is it harder to market a new product rather than a better product?

If you have an idea for a new product or service, expect the time and cost of introduction to be greater than might be the case with a product in an established market. Why?  Because no matter how great the need for your product, if there is not an existing product there is no demand.

“If you are to be innovative, you will have to spend the time to educate your market.  And education can be a slow process, often requiring the time necessary for you to establish a relationship with your customers and to gain the trust necessary for the customers to become somewhat innovative as well.”

Quoted from Thriving in the Changing Workplace, now available in print or eBook from Amazon.com.  Or contact http://www.yorkinc.com

Why is emotional stability an important quality for small business owners?

The most dangerous people on earth are the owners of small businesses because more people work for small businesses than big ones and there is usually no test for ownership.  One may need to be certified or licensed to practice a particular trade or profession, but ownership is rarely constrained.  Creating a happy, interactive work environment in which people feel appreciated and valued should always be the goal of a manager and is a requirement for a leader.  Temper tantrums and emotional irrationality on the part of the boss should be avoided at all cost.

“Business owners who create a workplace environment of fear, will most likely fail in time because, while fear can be a motivator, it is certainly one to be avoided.  Furthermore, when the owner has reason to be fearful or angry, as can often be the case, such emotionality should never be allowed to impact those in his/her charge.  People who feel safe and appreciated will be productive and a source of value to the business.”

Quoted from  The Successful Entrepreneur, Second Edition, now available in print or eBook from Amazon.  Or contact http://www.yorkinc.com.

Why is positive expectancy critical for our success in the marketplace?

“If I am angry or filled with negative energy of any kind, that negativity will communicate in ways I don’t understand, even though I have a smile on my face and I am pretending to be happy and joyful.  Here’s where self-talk can be most effective.  You can admit your anger or whatever negative energy you  are experiencing at the moment, yet say, “I don’t have to feel this way and I am changing my attitude to a belief in a positive outcome that will work toward my success.”  Whatever you believe is true, is true for you.  That’s why we end up  believing lies, e.g., I’m not good enough, pretty enough, etc.”

Quoted from Thriving in the Changing Workplace, now available in print or eBook from Amazon.com.  Or contact http://www.yorkinc.com

Why is comprehensive awareness so critical to the success of a small business owner?

“Unlike the corporate executive who has a staff to whom can be delegated roles and responsibilities, the small business owner must be responsible for the majority of functions him or herself.  In short, it’s the owner who must know what’s going on in every facet of the business, even if others are operationally responsible for achieving specific objectives.   Maintaining a finger on the pulse requires frequent communication and feedback to determine performance effectiveness.  The small guy can’t make many mistakes.  Large businesses round off more than a small firm grosses.”

Quoted from  The Successful Entrepreneur, Second Edition, now available in print or eBook from Amazon.  Or contact http://www.yorkinc.com.