Why is commitment so critical to success in a small business?

In the years that I have worked with people going through the process of organizational engendered career change, I have come to believe that desire and courage are the components that constitute commitment.  The willingness and the ability to step out into new areas of work that essentially place a person on his or her own, requires commitment to the task and the determination to do whatever it takes to find the right combination for success.  Fundamental to this outcome is the desire to be independent and the courage to take measured risk and to maintain effort with consistency of purpose even when the goal seems difficult to discern in the distant haze.

“But as Theodore Roosevelt said,  “It’s not the critic who counts. It’s not the man who points out how the strong man stumbled. Credit belongs to the man who really was in the arena, his face marred by dust, sweat, and blood, who strives valiantly, who errs to comes short and short again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming. It is the man who actually strives to do the deeds, who knows the great enthusiasm and knows the great devotion, who spends himself on a worthy cause, who at best, knows in the end the triumph of great achievement. And, who at worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly.

“Far better is it to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure… than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy nor suffer much, because they live in a gray twilight that knows not victory nor defeat.”

Quoted from Thriving in the Changing Workplace, now available in print or eBook from Amazon.com.  Or contact http://www.yorkinc.com

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What business might be right for you?

“Assuming that you consider yourself suited for self-employment, the next step is to determine the type of business that’s right for you.  While you may know what you want to own, you may not, and if so you’re in for a bit of a journey.  The starting point is to find the right combination of skill, interest and personal style that will maximize the success of the business you choose.  People frequently elect a business for which they have experience, interest and desire, but some like Ben & Jerry, of ice cream fame, started out with nothing more than a short course in ice cream production. It’s always important to remember that a business is a living entity and may well change its structure and composition periodically as the ownership, the market and/or the economic climate change.”

Quoted from  The Successful Entrepreneur, Second Edition, now available in print or eBook from Amazon.  Or contact http://www.yorkinc.com.

Why is true job search really problem-solving?

If one views marketing as the attempt to find a problem that one’s skills can solve, then the objective is win/win, since the marketer seeks nothing but mutual good.  A person should seek to meet with people, not to find a job but to find a problem that may represent a need for his or her talents.  In this event, if the marketer is committed to this concept, there is no intellectual reason not to seek to make the contacts that will produce the desired good for both parties.  From this point of view, it sounds really easy.  However, in practice, there is more to consider, because we tend to be programmed to fear rejection even when we understand intellectually that there is no personal slight involved.

If our goal is not clearly defined and reinforced with commitment, our fear of rejection, i.e., of failure, is likely to become greater than the intellectual interest we have in achieving a positive outcome. What distinguishes one person from another when it comes to dealing with rejection relates largely to self-esteem.  The person with high self-esteem is less likely to personalize rejection that will otherwise demotivate and immobilize a person with a fragile self-image.”

Quoted from Thriving in the Changing Workplace, now available in print or eBook from Amazon.com.  Or contact http://www.yorkinc.com

Why is a business plan so important?

Just as no sensible person would expect to cook a complicated meal without a recipe, no reasonable person would expect to run a business without a business plan.  Whether you know a little or a lot about your business, the business plan is a critical ingredient that can frequently make the difference between success and failure.  Although no business plan can guarantee success, a business with a good plan is about a hundred times more likely to succeed than one without a plan.

A business plan is a work in progress, it is not a static document.  Technological changes occur with such rapidity, that the business plan must correspondingly be modified as other changes occur.  This can be a hard lesson to learn.  Once we’ve completed the task, it’s hard to revise, perhaps on a moment’s notice. However, unless you’re willing to do so, you may fail, no matter how much you think you know.”

Quoted from  The Successful Entrepreneur, Second Edition, now available in print or eBook from Amazon.  Or contact http://www.yorkinc.com.