What’s the In in Integrity?

Integrity is a quality that too often is verbalized yet not internalized. It is the inner condition of the person that determines if that person is living the values, principles and morals upon which his or her life is built.  And like truth, integrity cannot be applied selectively; it must be practiced all the time.  If one is truthful at some times and not at others, the person is not a person of integrity.

Those who live by pretense fail to realize that their words betray their true nature, no matter what they seek to convey.  Those who practice deceit would do well to remember the words of Emerson, who said, “Who you are speaks so loud, I can’t hear what you say.”  As well should we all.

Now in print or as an eBook from Amazon, Thriving in the Changing Workplace and The Successful Entrepreneur, Second Edition by Norman York and Using Your Inner Power to find Meaningful Work by Norman and Madeleine York.  Now in production, Recareering™ for the Second Half of Life, by Norman York.

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Living under Grace

Some may call it luck or serendipity; however, many of our experiences occur through the intercession of a power that is greater than ourselves.  Most often we only recognize the appliance of this power retrospectively.  Indeed, there is most often no logical explanation for this outcome.  And the recognition may not occur until the passage of a significant period of time.  Yet each of us can recall events that fall into the category of the unexplained by which we were blessed.

There is no better example than the American Revolution. From 1763 until the Battle of Yorktown in 1781, the Colonial Army was defeated in so many of its battles with the British Army and its mercenaries, that there seemed little hope for American success.  Yet Washington defeated Cornwallis and a superior force in an event that can only be explained as occurring by Grace.

Now in print or as an eBook from Amazon, Thriving in the Changing Workplace and The Successful Entrepreneur, Second Edition by Norman York and Using Your Inner Power to find Meaningful Work by Norman and Madeleine York.  Now in production, Recareering™ for the Second Half of Life, by Norman York.

Why should disappointment, not really be disappointing?

The nature of the world creates many situations in which we become aggravated and angry; in other words disappointed.  One example might be the loss of a job and the difficulty associated with finding a new one.  Another might be the failure to obtain a business contract and its contrary implications for our small business. Despite the apparent disappointment, we can choose to view the circumstance as an opportunity to learn how to do what we did better in order to find success in the future.

The more we strive to view any experience from a positive perspective, the more likely we will be blessed by the ability of our inner power to give us new ideas and understandings that will lead to the success we desire.  However, when we are bogged down with negative energy, our unconscious computer can’t do its job.  First within, then without.

Now in print or as an eBook from Amazon, Thriving in the Changing Workplace and The Successful Entrepreneur, Second Edition by Norman York and Using Your Inner Power to find Meaningful Work by Norman and Madeleine York.

Who must the leader trust?

The first principle of leadership is trust; therefore, a true leader must be able to trust a staff or a team and also be able to help the team trust each other.  Furthermore, it is imperative that the team trust the leader.  In order to be trustworthy, the leader should become vulnerable and be willing to admit mistakes and demonstrate to the team that he/she, like us all, is imperfect and willing to learn from all sources and experiences, including from the team itself.  Therefore, the leader must first be able to trust him or herself!

Command and control managers are, for the most part, unable to trust others because they can’t trust themselves.  Their ability to operate from an organizational perspective is predicated primarily on their need to maintain the power to direct the activities of the team from a finite point of view.  Such people tend to concern themselves only with the outcome, giving little considerable to how the objective is achieved.

Now in print or as an eBook from Amazon, Thriving in the Changing Workplace and The Successful Entrepreneur, Second Edition by Norman York and Using Your Inner Power to find Meaningful Work by Norman and Madeleine York.

The Joy of Work

It is not unusual for us not to realize how much we enjoy our work until, for some reason or another, we no longer have it.  And even work that may not have been preferred can become joyful if we choose to see it as such.  Given the prospect of increased longevity, we are well-advised to continue to be productive for many years past the traditional age of retirement.

In his book, The Re-invention of Work, Mathew Fox has this to say, “Work comes from inside out; work is the expression of our soul, our inner being.  It is unique to the individual; it is creative.  Work is an expression of the Spirit at work in the world through us.  Work is that which puts us in touch with others, not so much at the level of personal interaction, but at the level of service in the community.”  And later, “We are indeed homo faber, a species content only if we have work.”

Now in print or as an eBook from Amazon, Thriving in the Changing Workplace and The Successful Entrepreneur, Second Edition by Norman York and Using Your Inner Power to find Meaningful Work by Norman and Madeleine York.