When we know what we know is sufficient for our needs

Being consciously competent is a comfortable state of mind.  However, in the information age being too comfortable can be a danger in itself.  In this dynamic world, technological change occurs so rapidly that unless we are constantly diligent to emerging technologies, we may find ourselves left behind.

Moore’s Law tells us that as technological capacity increases, the associated cost decreases in some reasonable proportion.  Such knowledge should be sufficient motivation to cause rational people to be ever vigilant.

Now in print or as an eBook from Amazon, Thriving in the Changing Workplace and The Successful Entrepreneur, Second Edition by Norman York and Using Your Inner Power to find Meaningful Work by Norman and Madeleine York.  Now in production, Recareering™ for the Second Half of Life, by Norman York.

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When we know what we know is not enough

It’s been said that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, in part because what we lack may be the critical ingredient for the outcome we seek.  We are consciously incompetent when we are aware of our informational deficiency; although, we may still be oblivious to the detail that we require or to its source.

If we are business leaders, we should surround ourselves with knowledgeable people, be they friends, colleagues or advisory board members.  Businesses, large and small, fail because of the 3 Cs—contempt, conceit and conservatism.  All the result of a lack of essential information needed to maintain business vitality.

Now in print or as an eBook from Amazon, Thriving in the Changing Workplace and The Successful Entrepreneur, Second Edition by Norman York and Using Your Inner Power to find Meaningful Work by Norman and Madeleine York.  Now in production, Recareering™ for the Second Half of Life, by Norman York.

When we don’t know what we don’t know

We are unconsciously incompetent when we don’t know what we don’t know within our realm of responsibility, which creates contrary challenges for ourselves and others.  Such a state of ignorance causes a person to be totally unaware of opportunities that can potentially improve the quality of life from many perspectives.

Consequently, we must constantly seek to gain knowledge and understanding that will absolve us from being victims of our own ineptitude and realize that there is always more to know than we know.  Whoever said ignorance is bliss was ignorant.

Now in print or as an eBook from Amazon, Thriving in the Changing Workplace and The Successful Entrepreneur, Second Edition by Norman York and Using Your Inner Power to find Meaningful Work by Norman and Madeleine York.  Now in production, Recareering™ for the Second Half of Life, by Norman York.

The Healing Power of Gratitude

It behooves us to consciously consider the extraordinary benefit we derive when we practice our ability to be grateful for life’s many blessings.  As is the case with maintaining a positive mental attitude, gratitude activates the immune system and promotes the healing process.  This reinforces the understanding that, to a great extent, good health is a choice.

As in the words to an old song, “Count your many blessings, name them one by one.”Setting aside regular periods of time to visualize the good things that life has provided is a powerful way to experience this blessing.  We should always remember that joyful people are more likely to be healthy people.

Now in print or as an eBook from Amazon, Thriving in the Changing Workplace and The Successful Entrepreneur, Second Edition by Norman York and Using Your Inner Power to find Meaningful Work by Norman and Madeleine York.  Now in production, Recareering™ for the Second Half of Life, by Norman York.