Who must the leader trust?

The first principle of leadership is trust; therefore, a true leader must be able to trust a staff or a team and also be able to help the team trust each other. Furthermore, it is imperative that the team trust the leader. To be trustworthy, the leader should become vulnerable and be willing to admit mistakes and demonstrate to the team that he/she, like us all, is imperfect and willing to learn from all sources and experiences, including from the team itself. Therefore, the leader must first be able to trust him or herself!
Command and control managers are, for the most part, unable to trust others because they can’t trust themselves. Their ability to operate from an organizational perspective is predicated primarily on their need to maintain the power to direct the activities of the team from a finite point of view. Such people tend to concern themselves only with the outcome, giving little considerable to how the objective is achieved.
Now in print or as an eBook from Amazon, find Thriving in the Changing Workplace and The Successful Entrepreneur, Second Edition by Norman York and Using Your Inner Power to Find Meaningful Work by Norman and Madeleine York. Now in production, “Recareering™ for the Second Half of Life by Norman York.

 

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The Power of Enthusiasm

 

The word enthusiasm is derived from the Greek word entheos, which means god within. Notice that it doesn’t say God, because in this context the word god simply means a power, irrespective of what we choose to call it. When we are enthusiastic about life we are experiencing this power with its healing, harmonizing and prospering nature.

Therefore, we have the choice to act enthusiastically even under circumstances that may be less desirable than we wish. People who are happy, experience the joy associated with enthusiasm and the blessings that it brings.

Now in print or as an eBook from Amazon, find Thriving in the Changing Workplace and The Successful Entrepreneur, Second Edition by Norman York and Using Your Inner Power to Find Meaningful Work by Norman and Madeleine York. Now in production, “Recareering™ for the Second Half of Life by Norman York.

Why success is an inside job

 

        The greatest problem that people face today in the world of employment is not the lack of work, but more specifically the variety of ways to earn a living.  While there may not be a lot of jobs in the traditional sense, there are plenty of opportunities for us to use our skills and abilities if we are willing to shift our paradigm from having a job to finding work.  The problem most often lies in the fact that many if not most people are faced with the task of learning how to market themselves to find work that they really didn’t like in the first place.  And as a result, their lack of motivation leads to perfunctory effort, which itself may have caused them to be among the victims.

 

In her book, Do What You Love, The Money Will Follow, Marsha Sinetar states that, “Right livelihood, embodies self-expression, commitment, mindfulness, and conscious choice.  Finding and doing work of this sort is predicated upon high self-esteem and self-trust, since only those who like themselves, who subjectively feel they are trustworthy and deserving, dare to choose on behalf of what is right and true for them.”  The essence of this statement suggests that we don’t make choices that are in our best interest because we don’t believe we are worthy of the work we love.

 

Now in print or as an eBook from Amazon, find Thriving in the Changing Workplace and The Successful Entrepreneur, Second Edition by Norman York and Using Your Inner Power to Find Meaningful Work by Norman and Madeleine York. Now in production, “Recareering™ for the Second Half of Life by Norman York.

 

 

 

Thoughts on commitment

 

Thoughts on commitment

 

            Commitment has been defined as the desire to achieve a worthy goal and the courage to do whatever is necessary to achieve it.  It sounds easy, but it isn’t.  Too many of us don’t see ourselves worthy of some significant objective.  Therefore, we must first work on our own self-image by thinking positively about ourselves and others.

 

            The same holds true for courage. For us to sustain the action necessary for success, we must first envision ourselves as having already achieved our goal and to experience the joy and satisfaction of achievement.  Remember, the unconscious computer is a goal-seeking mechanism—thoughts held in mind, reproduce after their kind.

Now in print or as an eBook from Amazon, find Thriving in the Changing Workplace and The Successful Entrepreneur, Second Edition by Norman York and Using Your Inner Power to Find Meaningful Work by Norman and Madeleine York. Now in production, “Recareering™ for the Second Half of Life by Norman York